sitting on the edge of the sandbox, biting my tongue

February 16, 2014

We Are a Part of That Statistic

Filed under: relationships — edge of the sandbox @ 7:09 pm

What is this world coming to?  According to a Pew survey, 21% Of married women in this country are now living with a spouse with fewer degrees, but out of newlywed women married to less credentialed men, only 39% out-earn their husbands.

Pew never called me, but I know the story.  I started dating my future husband when I was in grad school.  He already had his degree… from SF State… in creative writing.  Laugh all you want.

Furthermore, I was advised to not waste my time with him because, when asked “what do you do?” my future husband answered “I play music”.  But you see, I very much like his creative side, and never for a moment thought he was a waste of time.  I saw intelligence, I saw character and I saw the genes with which to make cute kids.

Degrees don’t mean much these days, and good man can be found in places other than colleges.  Then there is this opinion about marrying a man you didn’t meet in college:

Could you marry a man who isn’t your intellectual or professional equal? Sure. But the likelihood is that it will be frustrating to be with someone who just can’t keep up with you or your friends. When the conversation turns to Jean Cocteau or Henrik Ibsen, the Bayeux Tapestry or Noam Chomsky, you won’t find that glazed look that comes over his face at all appealing. (Via Instapundit)

I had to look up Bayeux Tapestry.  Then again, I wasn’t raised in the English-speaking world.  I’m not sure too many undergads read Chomsky (grad students might scan it, if absolutely necessary).  Jean Cocteau or Henrik Ibsen: are you kidding me?  Much of the workload these days consists of Rococo Marxist takes on pop culture.  I realize the author, Susan Patton, was probably just trying to dress up her point, not comment on the substance of college kids’ conversation, and I am on record saying that the college years are a good time to look for a husband.

Over at Instapundit some readers commented that the statistic of women marrying down education-wise but not financially probably picks up men with engineering degrees who only need a BS to be a top income earner.  Back in 1990’s San Francisco when the economy was good, one didn’t need a degree to break into programming, and that’s just what my husband did.  I’d like to think that I don’t need to see a diploma to figure out that I’m talking to a brainy man.

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5 Comments »

  1. With all the mail-order PHDs out there, I tend to distrust educated people in general until I find out whether or not they are part of the real world or still stuck in academic koolaid land. And No, I do not have a degree…had kids instead.

    Comment by calihurder — February 17, 2014 @ 8:49 am

  2. This is a great post, not least because it reminds me of an interview with Ayn Rand where she talked about her artist husband who made less money than her.

    An Arts degree these days is more of a way to join the cultural elite and write posts for trendy webzines like Slate or Salon than it is to make money. If I was a Progressive I would be sending items to those outfits daily.

    And ah, yes, the Bay Area during the dot com boom. Around 2000 or 2001 I was living in Benicia and my roommate owned a startup, so I created Pagemaker (!) documents for him in lieu of rent.

    Comment by Chandler's Ghost — February 20, 2014 @ 3:03 pm

    • All that plus I can’t believe how much some schools cost these days. Basically for kids whose parents are already well off and making a living is not an issue, it’s a way to spend their lives convincing themselves of their own importance.

      Comment by edge of the sandbox — February 23, 2014 @ 6:50 pm

  3. Who wants an educated person in America and their elite, marxist, state-educated ideology anyway?

    Comment by Infidel de Manahatta — February 24, 2014 @ 9:37 am


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