sitting on the edge of the sandbox, biting my tongue

October 26, 2015

Incubating National Bolsheviks

Filed under: immigration, politics, Russia — Tags: , , — edge of the sandbox @ 5:37 pm

National Bolsheviks were not on the radar of most Americans until, in the fallout of Ukraine’s Euromaidan, the Kremlin warmed up to the fascist Eurasianist Aleksandr Dugin.  Dugin was one of the founders of the political party, although by then he left his comrades and, in any event, the party was banned in 2007 (regrouping as The Other Russia).  Recently they were allowed, flaunting Russian law, to set up booths to recruit combat volunteers for Eastern Ukraine off the streets of Moscow.  Those volunteers fight the central government the United States supports militarily and financially.

Still many NazBols can legitimately claim prosecution, and they most certainly were vocal in opposing Putin in 2010.  It’s no surprise that at least two of them found themselves seeking refuge on American shores.

Among them Mikhail Gangan:

He became a member of the banned National Bolshevists [sic] Party when he turned 15. Later, he led its branch in Samara (the sixth largest city in Russia). In 2004 he took part in a local anti-government movement called “A Peaceful Takeover of the Reception Office of the Presidential Administration.” About 40 activists walked into the office of Putin’s representative in Samara and presented a list of 12 complaints. Among the accusations were elimination of political freedoms, destruction of independent media in Russia, the lack of autonomous judiciary system, and punitive actions against the opposition.

All protesters were arrested and accused of taking a deliberate action to take control of the government. If these charges were pressed, they would spend up to 20 years in prison. The charge was later changed to a lesser allegation of mass rioting. While under investigation, Gangan spent a year in Butyrka, a prison known for its poor living conditions that became known internationally after the death of Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky in 2009. Finally the Court sentenced Gangan to 3 years probation and he was released.

Forcing themselves into government buildings is a popular tactic of National Bolsheviks.  In 2006, 50 of them were arrested at State Duma following one such direct action designed to test the boundary between the legal and the illegal.

In 2007 Gangan led another anti-government action called “March of Protesters” during the Russia-EU Summit and he was accused of violating his probation. Before he was arrested, Gangan fled to the Ukraine. It was the only country that he could enter while on probation.

Later, he was captured and was about to be deported to Russia. Ukrainian and Russian human rights activists asked Ukrainian authorities not to give up Gangan but to grant him the status of a political refugee. In the summer of 2008, he got asylum in the Ukraine. The UN Refugee Agency offered Gangan political asylum in America, where he moved in 2009. A year later he was given the official status of political refugee in the U.S.

“I had no problems with assimilation in Ukraine. There is no language barrier, same mentality; Ukrainian life just slightly differs from Russian. Here [in the U.S.] everything is different and adaption has been quite difficult for me. I still can’t figure out what is what here. But it’s obvious that if you really want to make it here, it’s possible. All refugees get good benefits. The U.S. government provides us with an apartment for the first 6 months and even covers the cost of college education. For now, I got a job as a cook,” said Gangan.

Mikhail Gangan in customary National Bolshevik red and black garb

Good thing he got the benefits because, as one of his comrades explained:

Misha lived a life of a professional revolutionary, ridiculing the common busywork of work and study.  Often times he didn’t have the change to take public transport, but when money wondrously appeared, he, like a true hussar, blew it with friends in some kind of cafe.

Congratulations to the American taxpayer on adding a National Bolshevik variety to his collection of dependents!

Another NazBol fleeing for the US via Ukraine is Anna Ploskonosova.  Ploskonosova’s comrade and fiancée died after a beating administered, according to his friends and family, by Moscow militsia.  When in 2007 Ploskonosova left Russia, she was facing charges of vandalism and, rather unbelievably, assaulting a cop.

Anna Ploskonosova. National Bolshevik flags in the foreground

Settling in Ukraine, the young woman quickly found an outlet: she was arrested and fined 204 hrivnias for insulting then-president Yushenko.  What constitutes the insult?  Evidently, she participated in a May Day demonstration during which she chanted “Yushenko out!”   With Yushenko was voted out in short time and the now-deposed Yanukovich taking the oath of office, Ploskonosova though it was prudent to ask for asylum in the United States.

I have no idea what she and Gangan are up to these days, or even if they are still in the country –Gangan said he wasn’t interested in staying.  National Bolshevik founder Eduard Limonov once lived in the US; he hated it with a passion. So maybe the next generation of NazBols didn’t take to us either.

Gangan and Ploskonosova were still very young at the time they arrived to the US, so it’s possible that they matured and outgrew their specific Russian delinquencies.  Maybe they are now upstanding individuals.  But maybe they found Occupy, and maybe they found white nationalists. I have no doubt that their fear of prosecution was real, but I just don’t see why my country needs to take a chance on individuals of questionable moral character.

Having said that, letting NazBols settle here is nothing compared to giving refugee status to the Tsarnaevs.  It’s not obvious what either group has to add to our culture apart from diversity, but back in Russia they can one day ferment a revolution. Our immigration policy should not be designed to release the internal pressure on Putin.

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